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Jig types

Posted by maltatackle on December 28, 2011 at 3:30 PM

There are many different jig manufacturers on the market but they all produce jigs where the weight positioning is centre weighted, tail weighted or somewhere in between.

Centre weighted jigs –

These jigs are weight balanced near its centre. This jig is designed to flutter, glide and dart during the drop but fall slower than tail weighted designs. Use this jig in shallower water and for bottom fish (Snapper) that prefer a slower, fluttery presentation. These jigs are the most common and versatile designs and are must have weapons in the jiggers arsenal.

Tail weighted jigs –

These jigs are weight balanced at or near the tail. This jig is designed to drop and lift quickly with a little action. These are the jigs to target deep water bottom fish as their streamlined designs will resist the effects of current better.

The jigs also tend to have small face profiles for better streamlining thus reducing the jig load felt at the rod. Because they are used in deep water, most jigs tend to have luminous finishes which help illuminate this lethal offering to any prospective fish.

Use these jigs to target deep water Kingfish, Hapuka and Sea Bass.

Jig size –

When choosing the jig size - target fish, water depth and current flow should be considered. Heavy tail weighted jigs can be used with pin point accuracy on a small target. A common guide is for 100g for every 100’ of water.

Choosing between a short or long jig might be helped by comparing jig length to the local baitfish at the time. It is also a long-held belief by Japanese jiggers that a long jig resembles a big baitfish which will entice the bigger predators! This choice then becomes a personal one or one that is determined on the day as fish will always have their daily preferences.

Jig colour –

With a wide range of jig colours, patterns and finishes; it can be hard to choose a suitable colour. There is a long held belief that the jig colour should match the overhead light conditions i.e. dark overhead = dark coloured jig, bright sunny = bright coloured jigs. At night and during deep jigging sessions, jigs that are mostly luminous are popular because of their ability to be seen in the dark water. Often before the first drop, I will observe what colour jigs have been selected by other jiggers and then choose a different colour. This way most of the colour spectrum is covered and if there is a hot colour, then you can quickly change to that. In most cases, the prettiest jig is the one that gets tied on and we all know that you will only get bit if you have it in the water.

 

 

Categories: Fishing Tackle